SF CHRP

SF CHRP (San Francisco Committee for Human Rights in the Philippines) is a San Francisco based human rights advocacy group. Latest news and views on human rights in the Philippines.

Taskforce Haiyan Set Up in San Francisco

National Alliance for Filipino Concerns officer Ryan Leano (left), Filipino Community Center staff member Darah Macaraeg and Taskforce Haiyan volunteer Josephina Rubio lock arms as they pray (photo by Brant Ward/San Francisco Chronicle).

National Alliance for Filipino Concerns officer Ryan Leano (left), Filipino Community Center staff member Darah Macaraeg and Taskforce Haiyan volunteer Josephina Rubio lock arms as they pray (photo by Brant Ward/San Francisco Chronicle).

The San Francisco Committee for Human Rights in the Philippines, along with the progressive Filipino American alliances BAYAN-USA and NAFCON, including concerned individuals and local organizations and businesses, have set up Taskforce Haiyan in San Francisco. In an article for the San Francisco Chronicle Justin Berton wrote:

Frustrated by delayed relief efforts in regions of the Philippines most devastated by a powerful typhoon, leaders of an alliance of Filipino American organizations launched a campaign Wednesday to ask for donations and streamline those gifts to the islands.

The National Alliance for Filipino Concerns was among a number of groups trying to ramp up fundraising, and they announced their campaign, Taskforce Haiyan, as many Bay Area residents continued a desperate search for information about family members in the Philippines whom they have been unable to contact.

In San Francisco, Terry Valen, president of the National Alliance for Filipino Concerns, said the new task force was made up of local church leaders, politicians and Filipino organizations. He said 100 percent of donations would go toward typhoon relief.

“The donations are going straight to our networks on the ground in the worst-hit areas, some of whom are still waiting for clean water, clothing and shelter,” Valen said. “We can start building the infrastructure immediately.”

The Philippines government has failed to reach the most needy since the storm struck Friday, Valen said, killing more than 2,000 people and leaving hundreds of thousands displaced. He said donations through some larger aid agencies could take weeks to reach victims.

Valen was joined by Supervisor John Avalos, who will co-chair the task force. Avalos said it was important for donors to give through grassroots organizations that have well-established relationships with relief workers in the Philippines.

Ruby Ibarra, a 26-year-old San Lorenzo artist, is among those looking for information. She said Wednesday that her family has still not heard from her aunt and uncle, who live near Tacloban, one of the seaside towns demolished by the storm.

“I feel useless here,” Ibarra said. “I want to be there, looking for them with my family. We don’t know if they’re dead, or alive, or hiding somewhere.”

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This entry was posted on November 17, 2013 by and tagged , , , .

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